Online advertising fraud is highlighted by Doubleclick

Banner advertising’s challenges continue which has big implications for advertisers

Trust in the medium is squeezed from both ends: With consumers choosing to use ad blocking, and brands finding the lack of transparency, especially in ad network and programmatic buys, costly.

as trust in the medium is squeezed from both ends: With consumers choosing to use ad blocking, and brands finding the lack of transparency, especially in ad network and programmatic buys, costly.

According to the Doubleclick blog it has found that on one particular ad exchange up to 40% of inventory was delivered using fake domains, with several others clocking up between 15-38% fraudulent inventory.

In short, ad exchanges are being fooled into serving advertisements on websites that look like they’re a trusted, well-known publisher brand, but are in fact using copycat URLs. This has two effects: Advertisers will bid more to appear on premium websites, but aren’t getting the real inventory. And there is also a risk that the “imitation” site contains content that the advertiser might not want to be associated with.

Doubleclick, which is part of Google, is well placed to address this problem

It has introduced a filter system to spot dodgy inventory, while also acknowledging the fact that real publishers may use alternative domains for genuine purposes. The service has been added to Doubleclick’s proprietary Bid Manager to be accessed by all advertisers.

While programmatic systems, ad networks, and ad servers continue to refine delivery to make biddable ads relevant to consumers – and consumer targeting relevant and cost effective to brands – a good advertising mix should also hedge relevance and increase engagement by working directly with publishers on content partnerships, or indeed create its own, relevant marketable content.